Metaphysics as a creative craft

In my writings I have not infrequently been dismissive of metaphysics, arguing that most metaphysical claims are meaningless, unfalsifiable, and of no consequence to people’s lives (leaving aside the unfortunate historical fact that many people have been burned at the stake for believing metaphysical claims that others disliked).

Perhaps it is time to relent a little – to give the metaphysicians a little praise. At least I will try. The basis for this attempt is a re-framing of what metaphysics is about. Instead of thinking of it as a quasi-scientific activity of trying to work out ‘what the world is like’, perhaps we could instead think of it as a creative, artistic activity, of inventing new ways of thinking and feeling about the world. Metaphysics as a craft, as delightful and uncontentious as quilting.

Why would anybody want to do that? Well I can think of a couple of reasons, and here they are (except that, like the chief weapons of Python’s Spanish Inquisitor, the number of reasons may turn out to be either more or less than two).

We know that there is a very wide range of human temperaments, longings, fears and attachments. A perspective that is inspiring to one person may be terrifying to another, and morbidly depressing to a third. For instance some people long to believe in a personal God that oversees the universe, and would feel their life to be empty and meaningless without it. Others regard the idea with horror. Some people are very attached to the idea that matter – atoms, quarks and the like – really, truly exists rather than just being a conceptual model we use to make sense of our experiences. Philosophical Idealists (more accurately referred to as Immaterialists) have no emotional need for such beliefs, and accordingly deny the existence of matter, saying that only minds and ideas are real. Indeed some, such as George Berkeley, regard belief in matter as tantamount to heresy, which is why the subtitle of his tract ‘Three dialogues between Hylas and Philonous‘, which promoted his Immaterialist hypothesis, was ‘In opposition to sceptics and atheists‘.

So the wider the range of available metaphysical hypotheses, the more chance that any given person will be able to find one that satisfies her, and hence be able to live a life of satisfaction, free of existential terror. Unless of course what they really long for is existential terror, in which case Kierkegaard may have a metaphysical hypothesis that they would love.

One might wonder – ‘why do we need metaphysical hypotheses, when we have science?‘ The plain answer to this is ‘we don’t‘. But although we do not need them, it is human nature to seek out and adopt them. That’s because, correctly considered, science tells us not ‘the way the world is‘, but rather, what we may expect from the world. A scientific theory is a model that enables us to make predictions about what we will experience in the future – for instance whether we will feel the warmth of the sun tomorrow, and whether if we drop an apple we will see it fall. Scientific theories may seem to say that the world is made of quarks, or spacetime, or wave functions, but they actually say no such thing. What they say is, if you imagine a system that behaves according to the following rules – which might be rules about subatomic particles like quarks – and you observe certain phenomena (such as my letting go of the apple), then the behaviour of that imaginary system can guide you as to what you will see next (such as the apple falling to the ground).

It’s just as well that scientific theories say nothing about ‘the way the world is’, because they get discarded every few decades and replaced by new ones. The system described by the new theory may be completely different from that described by the previous one. For instance the new one may be all about waves while the previous one was all about tiny particles like billiard balls (electrons, protons and neutrons in the Rutherford model of the atom). But most of the predictions of the two theories will be identical. Indeed, if the old theory was a good one, it will only be in very unusual conditions that it makes different predictions from those of the new theory (eg if the things being considered are very small, very heavy or very fast). So by recognising that scientific theories are descriptions of imaginary systems that allow us to make predictions, rather than statements about the way the world is, we get much greater continuity in our understanding of the world, because not much changes when a theory is replaced.

I think of metaphysics as the activity of constructing models of the world (‘worldviews’) that contain more detail and structure than there is in the models of science. We do not need the more detailed models of metaphysics for our everyday life. Science gives us everything we need to survive. But, being naturally curious creatures, we tend to want to know what lies behind the observations we make, including the observations of scientific ‘laws’. So we speculate – that the world is made of atoms like billiard balls, or strings, or (mem’)branes, or a wave function, or a squishy-wishy four-dimensional block of ‘spacetime’, or quantum foam, or ideas, or noumena, or angels, demons, djinn and deities. This speculation leads to different mental models of the world.

So metaphysics adds additional detail to our picture of the world. Some suggest that it also adds an answer to the ‘why?’ question that science ignores (focusing only on ‘how?’). I reject that suggestion. As anybody knows that has ever as a child tried to rile a parent with the ‘but why?’ game, and as anybody that has been thus riled by a child knows, any explanation at all can be questioned with a ‘but why?’ question. No matter how many layers of complexity we add to our model, each layer explaining the layer above it, we can always ask about the lowest layer – ‘but why?’ Whether that last layer is God, or quarks, or strings, or the Great Green Arkleseizure, or even Max Tegmark’s Mathematical Universe, one can still demand an explanation of that layer. By the way, my favourite answers to the ‘But why?’ question are (1) Just because, (2) Nobody knows and (3) Why not? They’re all equally valid but I like (3) the best.

Some of these mental models have strong emotional significance, despite having no physical significance. For instance strong solipsism – the belief that I am the only conscious being – tends to frighten people and make them feel lonely. So most people, including me, reject it, even though it is perfectly consistent with science. Some people get great comfort from metaphysical models containing a god. Others find metaphysical models without gods much more pleasant.

So I would say that metaphysics, while physically unnecessary, is something that most people cannot help doing to some extent, and that people often develop emotional attachments to particular metaphysical models.

Good metaphysics is a creative activity. It is the craft of inventing new models. The more models there are, the more people have to choose from. Since there are such great psychological and emotional differences between people, one needs a great variety of models if everybody that wants a model is to be able to find a model with which they can be comfortable.

Bad metaphysics (of which there is a great deal in the world of philosophy) is trying to prove that one’s model is the correct one. I call this bad because there is no reason to believe that there is such a thing as ‘the correct model’ and even if there was one, we’d have no way of finding out what it is. There can be ‘wrong’ models, in the sense that most people would consider a model wrong if it is logically inconsistent (ie generates contradictions). But there are a myriad of non-contradictory models, so there is no evidence that there is such a thing as ‘the right model’. Unfortunately, it appears that most published metaphysics is of this sort, rather than the good stuff.

It’s worth noting that speculative science is also metaphysics. By ‘speculative science’ I mean activities like string theory or interpretations of quantum mechanics. I favour Karl Popper’s test for whether a model is (non-speculative) science, which is whether it can make predictions that will falsify the model if they do not come true. A model that is metaphysical can move into the domain of science if somebody invents a way of using it to make falsifiable predictions. Metaphysical models have done this in the past. A famous example is the ‘luminiferous aether’ theory, which was finally tested and falsified in the Michelson-Morley experiment of 1887. Maybe one day string theorists will be able to develop some falsifiable predictions from the over-arching string theory modeli that will move it from the realm of metaphysics to either accepted (if the prediction succeeds) or discarded (if the prediction fails) science. However some metaphysical models seem unlikely to ever become science, as one cannot imagine how they could ever be tested. The debate of Idealism vs Materialism (George Berkeley vs GE Moore) is an example of this.

So I hereby give my applause to (some) metaphysicians. Some people look at philosophy and say it has failed because it has not whittled down worldviews to a single accepted possibility. They say that after three millenia it still has not ‘reached a conclusion’ about which is the correct worldview. I ask ‘why do you desire a conclusion?‘ My contrary position is to regard the proliferation of possibilities, the generation of countless new worldviews, as the true value of metaphysics. The more worldviews the better. Philosophy academics working in metaphysics should have their performance assessed based not on papers published but on how many new worldviews they have invented, and how evocatively they have described them to a thirsty and variety-seeking public. Theologians could get in on the act too, and some of the good ones (a minority) do. Rather than trotting out dreary, flawed proofs of the existence of God. the historicity of the resurrection, or why God really does get very cross if consenting grown-ups play with one another’s private parts, they could be generating creative, inspiring narratives about what God might be like and what our relationship to the God might be. They could manufacture a panoply of God mythologies, one to appeal to every single, unique one of us seven billion citizens of this planet. Some of us prefer a metaphysical worldview without a God, but that’s OK, because if the philosopher metaphysicians do their job properly, there will be millions of those to choose from as well. Nihilists can abstain from all worldviews, and flibbertigibbets like me can hop promiscuously from one worldview to another as the mood takes them.

We need more creative, nutty, imaginative, inspiring metaphysicians like Nietzsche, Sartre, Simone Weil and Soren Kierkegaard, not more dry, dogmatic dons that seek to evangelise their own pet worldview to the point of its becoming as ubiquitous as soccer.

Andrew Kirk

Bondi Junction, January 2015

i. Not just a prediction of one of the thousands of sub-models. Falsifying a sub-model of string theory is useless, as there will always be thousands more candidates.

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2 Comments on “Metaphysics as a creative craft”

  1. ihtio says:

    “metaphysics, while physically unnecessary” – well, physics, mathematics, biology are also not physically nesessary 🙂

    Your account of what metaphysics is is weird, specifically as the most important factor for you is the falsifiability of statements of a scientific or a metaphysical theory or a system. Are we to accept that a theory suddenly plunges from metaphysics into physics, when we are able to test its predictions (as happened with Einstein’s theories)? I have found a great post on this issue on another (not mine) blog:
    https://egtheory.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/falsifiability/

    Your account of science is also a bit akward. It seems that you reduce the value of a scientific theory to its predictive power, or simply speaking “what can we do with it” (utilitarianism), completely disregarding the power of a theory to understand the world.

    What I like the most in metaphysical systems are:
    – generality — a system is about everything or most of the things we encounter,
    – a ground for scientific theories — every scientific theory rests on some philosophical — in particular metaphysical — foundations, even if implicitly assumed by scientists who have proposed the theory. A good metaphysics is a fertile ground, system of thought, light pointing to a direction, that helps us in developing better scientific theories. It is clear when we think about atomism. For centuries people believed that the reality really is composed of small balls that interact with each other in ways analogous to billard balls. Lay people still believe that. This is metaphysics. When we change our metaphysical glasses to process philosophy (Whitehead), we see something dramatically different when we look at the same things. Then, we think about them in different ways and come up with (scientific) theories that may be more elegant, pleasant, general, with better predictions, revealing even more phenomena, or whatever.
    – inescapability — one cannot escape from metaphysics. Even if you are a logician or a mathematician, you have some biases, ideologies, metaphysics that your thinking adheres to. Even if you cannot explicate it clearly.
    – ways of understanding — today with all that quantum and string buzz going around we are baffled by equations that are just symbols written on a blackboard, with no meaning. But we want to understand things, not only to be able to make predictions. It’s similar with the Big Data hype. Bit Data analytics may give us better predictions, more accurate models with bazzilions of parameters, but in the end they are useless if we want to understand the world. Metaphysics gives exactly that: understanding, even if too general.

  2. Tom W. says:

    Hi Andrew, and thank you for this post.

    As a humble and aspiring ‘quilter’, I appreciate your attempt to ‘relent’.

    I particularly like your clarification that science doesn’t say ‘what it is’ but ‘how it can be expected to behave’.

    I wanted to add that one of the things ‘doing metaphysics’ does is, in crafting world views, enable scientists (your ‘speculative scientists’) to _ask_new_questions_ (or better questions?) to further our scientific knowledge. At least, that’s the best I hope for in my own work – to shift perspectives and change minds so that they ask newer or more pertinent questions.

    For example, if one adopts the metaphysical perspective I’m working on (I only use this to speak of what I know, not for self promotion – my work is _far_ from being ‘adoptable’ just yet!) which understands all of reality as being ‘made of’ transformations, one might ‘understand’ that the scientist attempting to ‘discover’ new particles is actively – albeit reluctantly – creating them, and will always create them (by ‘looking’ you _will_ necessarily ‘find’ because you ‘make’ what you’re looking for). In this way, maybe scientists/physicists might ease-up on QM interpretations and instead investigate what can be done with these transformations (does that reveal my engineering bias? Oops). Theories and experiments might arise which tests the behaviours and interactions of these transformations – to test the limits of what these transformations can do. We might then discover that the limit of the speed of light (for example, and ‘just for fun’) might be borne out of a misconception of the very nature of reality – for example, transformations can very well be ‘instantaneous’… This might push investigations into faster-than-light events, etc.

    So, in conclusion, _good_ metaphysics (as you put it) can actually prove quite fruitful (even crucial?) for newer scientific discoveries… But that’s just my humble opinion 🙂

    What do you think?

    All the best,

    Tom White (a.k.a. taomath)


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